The Angry Miner

When you have hunted MTUs long enough, you begin to notice certain patterns to the reactions of capsuleers whose MTUs you have successfully destroyed. For example, you can pop MTUs owned by mission runners all day long and not hear a peep from them, but the moment you so much as look in the direction of a miner’s MTU, all hell breaks loose.

Some examples of this have already been featured on my blog in the past, in this post a Russian miner launches a tirade of abuse at me through local chat, and in this post, a miner actually grabs his PvP ship and attacks me.

One night, on a typical hunt through the Essence region, I noticed an MTU on D-Scan in Villore and parked myself at a moon. I was about to start the process of probing it down when I realised that it was actually in an asteroid belt and I could just warp to it. I can remember feeling a little trepidation at this point, knowing that when you attack an MTU in an asteroid belt, there is a good chance you’re going to have to deal with an upset miner, one way or another. This time, however, the kill went by uneventfully, it was your typical asteroid belt MTU kill, filled with ore and cheap rat droppings.

kill: Sandra Boirelle (Mobile Tractor Unit)

I went to bed after this kill, but when I logged in the following day, I found this rather rude EVEmail waiting for me:

EVE Mail

*Sigh* Here we go.

I don’t get a lot of correspondence from angry folk, most players either find what I do amusing, or they are completely oblivious to it, but still, it happens from time to time. I decided that it was important to help this player calm down and look at things objectively, so I responded thusly:

EVE Mail

That should help…

EVE Mail

…maybe not.

A few minutes after that last mail, the miner sent a follow-up mail where she, for some reason, started talking about Microwarpdrives, wardecs, and MTU mechanics.

EVE Mail

Be a manly man.

In a response mail, I tried to get her to understand that I don’t do what I do out of malice, I do it to make highsec a cleaner place. However, I also questioned her knowledge of MTU mechanics, which in hindsight may not have been the best thing to do at that point.

EVE Mail

Yikes.

With the threat of execution looming over my head, I sent one desperate final mail to try to calm her down, but it was futile. I received no further communication from this capsuleer.

Let this post serve as a warning to any prospective MTU Hunters out there. One day you are going to find an MTU in an asteroid belt, ice field, or mining site/mission, and chances are you will have to deal with this kind of hostility.

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The Dissatisfied Customer

Today we have a special treat, a short story from fellow MTU Hunter, Oylpann Kumamato. Pour yourself a hot drink, put your feet up, and join him on one of his many adventures.


I was heading back to Simela, my happy hunting grounds, after flying through multiple backwater systems with no luck. Tristis is already in Simela in her trusty CovOps and bazinga! One MTU. She locks it in after 2 scans and warps to it at 100km. Two Battlecruisers are running a mission there, a Ferox and a Drake Navy Issue.

Fast Foward 10 jumps and roughly 8 mins later the Battlecruisers have left grid, and left that dangerous deployable out there. I fleet up my dynamic duo and when Oyl gets in system, I warp to Tris who is now orbiting the MTU cloaked at 30km. Oyl makes quick work of the MTU and after the weapons timer, I dock up in a nearby player owned station.

Kill: Selendria Hinonami (Mobile Tractor Unit)

While I’m looking at the Killmail, I notice that Local Chat had an interesting recruitment link.. from the same person whose MTU I just purged, within seconds of her MTU exploding:

Selendria Hinonami Local Chat

Shortly after, I get an Eve Mail from said victim:

Selendria Hinonami Oylpann Kumamato Mail

Click on image for full size.

I reply back I’m just doing my job!

Selendria Hinonami Oylpann Kumamato Mail

Click on image for full size.

They respond that they want reimbursement so I offer what I feel is fair compensation:

Selendria Hinonami Oylpann Kumamato Contract

Click on image for full size.

I also offered some sound advice (for free!) on future purchases:

Selendria Hinonami Oylpann Kumamato Mail

Hope you get as good of a laugh as I did out of it.


I certainly did, thank you for the story Oylpann, and I have no doubt we’ll be seeing more of you in future posts. Stay tuned. Also, if anyone reading this has an MTU story of their own to share, please mail me (Pix Severus) in-game.

Furthermore, we now have a new page on the sidebar, MTU FAQ, which aims to answer those questions most commonly received about MTUs and hunting them, check it out.

The Magpie

In earlier posts I told the stories of my adventures with Yellow Parasol, a newcomer to EVE who hunted MTUs with me. Today, I would like to tell you the story of our final hunt together.

Whilst hunting MTUs solo one night, my hunting route took me to the system of Jaschercis. Once I had parked myself at a moon, I activated D-Scan, and what I saw next almost made my eyes pop out of my head.

Magpie MTU D-Scan

The lesser-spotted Magpie.

‘Magpie’ Mobile Tractor Units are the most elusive of all MTU variants in highsec. How elusive you might ask? At this point in time I had around 400 MTU kills, and had only seen a Magpie on D-Scan once before, which was scooped shortly after spotting it. These MTUs are very expensive, commanding a price of over 150m ISK at the time (they’re closer to 200m now) so finding one was like hitting the jackpot, the problem now was how to go about claiming my winnings.

Before I continue with the story, I would like to clarify the differences between the various types of MTUs, which may help you understand why the prices vary (all prices are based on Jita sell orders at the time of writing this):
Mobile Tractor Unit – Standard MTU, [7.5m ISK]
‘Packrat’ Mobile Tractor Unit – More hitpoints (+5k shield + 5k armor + 10k hull), slightly harder to scan down (+100 sensor strength) [20m ISK]
‘Magpie’ Mobile Tractor Unit – Same hitpoints as standard MTU, considerably harder to scan down (+250 sensor strength) [200m ISK]
For more general information, and stats of MTUs, click here.

I immediately set about probing this thing down, only to find that I couldn’t get anywhere near a 100% scan on it, the strongest scan I could get was around 70% before I gave up. My scanning knowledge was limited, but I knew that trying to scan this thing down in a Hecate just wasn’t going to work, I needed more scan strength, a lot more, so I headed to Dodixie to see what was available. I bought myself a Heron (a frigate with bonuses to scanning) and fit a Sister’s Expanded Probe Launcher to it. I also bought myself the 6% scanning implant (AR-806), and after giving the Heron a reasonable fit, I headed back to try scanning down that Magpie again.

Magpie MTU Probe Scan

Ouch.

Moon.. parked at, probes.. deployed, scanning.. 81%. Damn! No matter how much I tried, I couldn’t get higher than 81% on the scan, even after fiddling with the position of individual probes. My scanning skills weren’t perfect, but this was like some kind of sick joke, I was so close yet so far. I tried searching online for anything that could help me probe down a Magpie, but all I found were references to a deleted video (on Google Videos, remember that?) with the information it once held long-lost to the void.

During my attempts at scanning, I had been casually chatting with Yellow in a private channel, I told him that I’d found a rare MTU which was difficult to scan, this piqued his interest and he wasted no time in flying across highsec to join me and take a look. While Yellow was making his way to me, I decided that probing this MTU down wasn’t going to work, not with my skills, it was time to use drastic measures instead. I would scan this Magpie down using a combination of D-Scan and bookmarks.

Scanning something down using D-Scan and bookmarks is the time-consuming process of attempting to warp your ship through an object’s grid (the zone/chunk of space it occupies) and placing a bookmark within it, allowing you to warp to, and occupy, the same space as the object. The size of a grid is 8000km from the centre of the object that occupies it, this might seem like a large area, but given the obscene scale of solar systems in EVE, landing a ship within this area of space is like threading a needle.

To get started with this process, you need an idea of where the object is on the solar system map, which I had, thanks to my probing work earlier. You then need to find several warp paths that allow you to place bookmarks around the approximate location of the object from several angles. Normally you can do this by flying between celestials, but the Magpie I was hunting was in the unfortunate position of being on the edge of all celestials in the system. I needed to get a bookmark from the opposite side of the Magpie from where the celestials were, but there was nothing there, no player-structures, ships, nothing.

When Yellow arrived, I briefed him on my predicament, I needed a way to warp to an area of the solar system where there was nothing to warp to. Yellow didn’t quite understand what I was trying to do at this point, but in his brilliance he suggested taking missions from agents in the system, to hopefully create a mission room in the void that I was trying to occupy. We both proceeded to annoy the hell out of the mission agents in the system, by accepting and abandoning missions over and over, until we finally found a mining mission that, once we warped to, put us in a position where I could start making bookmarks around the MTU.

Magpie MTU Solar System Map

Click on image for full size.

I’m sorry if I’ve lost you at this point, as it is rather difficult to explain, especially to those who may have little knowledge of scanning. In the above screenshot, the Magpie’s location is the orange dot within the cube. All celestials within the system are to the right of the orange line, meaning there were no warp paths that would allow me to pass near or through the Magpie’s grid. The mission pocket we created when we accepted the mining mission allowed us to get a path from the other side of the Magpie, and from this point onward, we could get to work making bookmarks.. lots of bookmarks.

Magpie MTU Solar System Map

Click on image for full size.

Now it was simply a case of spending the next few hours making bookmarks around the MTU, and keeping an eye on the MTU’s distance from us using D-Scan, as we inched our way closer and closer to it. The angle slider in the D-Scan window was crucial here as it allowed us to see if we were too far above or below the target, Yellow had a much better grasp of this mechanic than I did, and his work helped shave-off hours of frustrating work. He also shared this video of a Magpie with me, which helped break the monotony of staring at bookmarks: Magpie Hangs Upside Down.

Magpie MTU Bookmarks

I wasn’t kidding when I said a LOT of bookmarks.

After creating a vast web of bookmarks (over 120 of them!), finding ourselves within 30k of the Magpie, I warped between 2 new bookmarks and saw a magical sight, the MTU appeared on my overview for a split-second! Now all I had to do was spam CTRL+B along this path until I landed a bookmark within the Magpie’s grid. Which I did. When I landed on this bookmark, I found myself a few thousand kilometers from the MTU within it’s grid and started burning towards it, before realising that I could just warp to 0 on the MTU. I also forgot that I was still in the Heron and didn’t have any guns to shoot the thing with, so after having Yellow warp to me via the fleet window, I reshipped into a Svipul and headed back.

Magpie MTU getting blapped

Blappity Blap.

With our combined Minmatar firepower (Yellow was in a Stabber) we made short work of the Magpie.

Kill: Krushovitsa (‘Magpie’ Mobile Tractor Unit)

The MTU was empty, but we really didn’t care, we had just pulled-off quite the feat together. This was a first for both of us, and for me personally, I considered it my graduation from the ranks of being just your average MTU Hunter. An evening well spent indeed.

Victory pose

Victory pose.

Since this kill, I have had just 2 more Magpie kills, here they are for your perusal:

Kill: Kosh Qapla (‘Magpie’ Mobile Tractor Unit)
Kill: Sun Ying (‘Magpie’ Mobile Tractor Unit)

It wasn’t until I had found my second Magpie almost a year later, that I realised I could have saved all of that effort by simply buying an Astero, which gives just enough scanning strength combined with a Sister’s launcher and probes, to nail 100% on a Magpie scan (with some probe fiddling). If I could go back, I wouldn’t want to change the experience I had by doing it the hard way, and if you’re into scanning at all, I would encourage you to give this method a try sometime, for the challenge.

Chronologically, we have reached the end of my journey with Yellow Parasol, however, there are a few more stories to share about our (mostly his) various shenanigans, which I’ll get around to in a future post.

Vocal Local 5

One thing I have noticed during my travels throughout highsec space is just how quiet it is, there could be over 100 people in local, and not a single word is uttered between those players. This makes me sad, so I like to encourage discourse where possible.

So when I enter a system with a funny name, I just have to comment on it.

Local Chat

Local Chat

Some funny chats can be had through this method, and I highly recommend it if you can’t think of any better ways to break the ice with the locals.


Local Chat

Sometimes, simply taking care of your appearance can get the locals buzzing. Tip: Nanite paste can do wonders for your complexion, as well as your armor!


Local Chat

Keeping your bio loaded with fun killmails to read is a great way to entertain the locals.


Local Chat

Putting links to your EVE-related websites in your bio is another.


Local Chat

Simply naming your ship something interesting and/or funny can also help to keep pilots smiling. At this point in time my ship was named “I’m not probing you!”


Local Chat

Here’s that killmail. Following this, we had a good, long discussion about The New Order of Highsec in local chat, which cowboy taximan wasn’t a fan of, probably due to being ganked by New Order agents in the past.


Local Chat

Here’s the killmail – the MTU’s owner has an interesting killboard, 0 kills 26 losses, ALL MTUs.

I met Omaha Eto one night whilst on a standard MTU hunt through the The Forge, he seemed most intrigued about my chosen profession.

Local Chat

This was the second time I had ever been thanked for my work in local, and it is always appreciated.

Local Chat

After our brief exchange in local, I moved-on to the next system to continue hunting. Afterwards, Omaha opened a private conversation with me, where we continued our conversation.

Omaha Eto > what is your motivation?
Omaha Eto > why are u doin this?
Pix Severus > its strange really, one day i saw a guy shooting an mtu in an asteroid belt, and he was only suspect, not criminal, and i thought to myself, i could do that..
Omaha Eto > haha nice
Pix Severus > so i started scanning for them, and one thing led to another..
Pix Severus > now i fly a ship with a probe scanner, hunting mtus, and all sorts of weird things happen to me
Omaha Eto > is that fun to you? lol
Pix Severus > yes, its a lot of fun, but i agree that its weird, just scanning down mtus and shooting them
Pix Severus > but i meet a lot of people, some get angry, but some are interested, like yourself
Pix Severus > either way, it gives me things to write about
Omaha Eto > i’ve never seen such a strange profession. well i became suspicious when i saw your flashing yellow icon and came to you profile and so on
Pix Severus > thats great, you are wise to check suspect characters
Pix Severus > they could be up to anything

Sometimes I feel very happy that I began hunting MTUs, as I get to experience pleasant chats like these from time to time.

Pix Severus > you wont believe this, but i just found a gecko in Uoyonen
Pix Severus > just sitting in space, alone, 50m+ in my pocket lol
Omaha Eto > i should say its kinda crazy but cool. you are one of a kind i guess.
Omaha Eto > gecko…rly nice!
Pix Severus > you are too kind sir!
Omaha Eto > well i actually think this game can give a lot of opportunities to player but i didn’t expect someone can use them in such way
Pix Severus > EVE truly is one of a kind
Pix Severus > the only mmo that allows players to be creative
Omaha Eto > i’m actually newbie to this game. three weeks only. running missions right now but willing to scan and travel in expedition frigates in future.
Pix Severus > scanning and exploration is a lot of fun, and gives you so much freedom in this game, i highly recommend it
Omaha Eto > i’ll do it for sure. thx a lot for recomendations and your cool game story dude. that was rly awesome ;)

There you have it, if you ever need an excuse to start chatting with people in local, exchanges like these are a good one. Contrary to the stories you read about EVE elsewhere, not everyone who plays this game is a scary sociopath, so the next time you get the chance to enter a discussion in local, go for it!

Vocal Local 4

Adventures with Yellow Parasol

In my previous post I detailed how I met yellow parasol, a player who was new to EVE and sought to experience some of the things he had read about the game prior to playing it himself. He was able to earn himself a nice sum of ISK whilst deftly avoiding the PVE trap that seems to capture most new players to the game. It would also turn out that his thirst for shenanigans was almost unquenchable, a thirst that I was more than happy to attempt to sate by inviting him on an MTU hunt.

Scrammed MTU

That MTU isn’t going anywhere.

We decided early-on to split any loot gained from our MTU hunts 50/50, I was to bring my Hecate “D-Scan Horror” whilst yellow brought his trusty Slasher. This ended-up being a fine combination, with the added DPS of the Slasher helping to bring the MTUs down a little quicker, and the extra cargo capacity being most useful for picking-up any loot that dropped. More than that, though, it was nice to have some company along for the ride, in an activity that I had always done solo in the past.

Scanning down and popping MTUs aren’t the only things I do on a hunt, I explore, try to strike up conversations with the locals, scoop abandoned drones, and anything else that takes my fancy. On our first MTU hunt together, yellow and I stopped to check out a citadel (a new type of player-owned structure, at the time) in the system of Tvink; before leaving the system we decided to check if any of the local mission runners needed assistance:

Local Chat

For some reason, most mission runners scoop their MTU and warp away the moment someone lands in their mission, this is quite an anti-social thing to do in a multiplayer game, just saying. Aside from the usual shenanigans, our first two hunts went by quite uneventfully, we racked-up 13 MTU kills in total, most of which were standard kills containing very little or no loot. Despite this, we had fun, and often spent more time chatting than doing anything else.

It wasn’t until a few days later, during our third hunt together, that things got a little more interesting. I took yellow on one of my long MTU roams, where I set a course for the outer reaches of highsec and see what kind of trouble I can get myself into. MTU kills are rarer on such roams, but finding and killing an MTU out there in the quieter systems can feel very satisfying indeed. Having found only one MTU that night, in the system of Baviasi, we were on our way back to civilisation when I spotted another MTU on D-Scan. This one was sitting in an asteroid belt in the system of Bahromab, and was surrounded by mining ships.

I didn’t bother probing this MTU down, with only 3 belts at planet IX in this system, we just flew to each one until we found it. Upon landing in the belt, yellow had reached the MTU first and immediately set upon shooting it, shortly afterwards I noticed one of the miners warp out; was he going to come back in a hauler and scoop the MTU, or was something more sinister afoot? At this point I began shooting the MTU too, in the hopes of killing it a little more quickly, just in case. A few seconds later, the miner returned in an Executioner.

Frigate Fight

Click on image for full size.

The miner, KappaClaus KappaPride, landed in the belt and started burning towards us, targeting us both. He decided to start shooting yellow first, and due to highsec mechanics, I was powerless to help him. If I had shot the miner at this point, I would have faced the wrath of CONCORD and lost my ship, in which case it would be possible that this miner would score two kills and save the MTU (which didn’t even belong to him, it turned out) and that would be unacceptable. I had no choice but to continue shooting the MTU whilst watching the fight, a fight which yellow unfortunately lost.

Kill: yellow parasol (Slasher)

Although dejected at this outcome, I was determined to salvage something from this and get the MTU down at least; but then the unthinkable happened, the miner, who had been targeting me the whole time during his fight with yellow, began burning towards me and turned on his warp scrambler. With the base speed of my Hecate being quite slow (this was before the T3 Destroyer balance patch) and his scrambler turning off my MWD, I found that I couldn’t get close enough to him to land any damage on him with my short-range guns, but as it turned out, that didn’t matter, as something even stranger happened next: he turned off his warp scrambler. My microwarpdrive came to life, I closed the gap between us in just a couple of seconds, and a few seconds after that my guns tore his ship apart.

Kill: KappaClaus KappaPride (Executioner)

A strange fight indeed, why did he turn his scrambler off and throw away the fight like that? This question was answered shortly after the fight when the miner began pouring salt into local chat:

Local Chat

Local Chat

It turns out that he had “Auto Target Back” enabled in his settings, which caused his ship to automatically target anyone (me) targeting him. He then used his warp scrambler on me “by mistake”, realised his error, and turned it off again hoping I wouldn’t continue shooting him. I don’t know why he expected me not to shoot him though, he interrupted our MTU hunt, killed my friend’s ship, and then directly aggressed me; of course I was going to kill him.

There were still important matters to attend to, we had an MTU that needed popping, and since the interruption it had sucked-in the wreck of yellow’s ship.

Kill: Ankr Vonzeer (Mobile Tractor Unit)

Yellow was quite pleased at getting on the killmail, and he was even more pleased that one of the corpses he had in his ship’s cargo had survived the MTU’s explosion. By the time the MTU had popped, the asteroid belt had been completely emptied, abandoned by the local miners. Yellow declared ownership of the belt in local, and claimed the title “Heavyweight Belt Champion” for himself. All in all, a very interesting and successful hunt.

This isn’t the end of our shenanigans together, stay tuned for the continuation.

Yellow Parasol is a pretty cool guy

In a previous post, I detailed a side-activity of mine, which is to leave containers at gates in each system I have hunted in along with the simple message: “Pix Severus was here o/”. I received many mails and other such communications from capsuleers who had seen my containers, but one mail in particular created an opportunity for even more fun whilst hunting MTUs.

One night, while travelling to a market hub to offload some of the vast quantities of loot I had accumulated on my MTU hunts, I received a mail from a fellow named yellow parasol:

EVE Mail

Another example of a standard type of mail I tend to receive from pilots who have seen my containers, I reply to all of them of course, and this one was no exception. After a little back and forth via EVE mail, where we shared some greetings and mutual encouragement, I decided to do something for this obviously-enthusiastic newbie:

EVE Mail

This humble gesture from an MTU Hunter pleased yellow parasol very much indeed; he immediately set-off to find the can and see it for himself. After he had arrived at the can (I had moved on elsewhere to continue to hauling my loot) he sent me a follow-up mail:

EVE Mail

I sent the ISK back, of course, with a little extra on top. I was very happy that such a simple action (anchoring a container) had created such fun times for a new player. That wasn’t to be the end of his luck with the container, however, his wallet continued to grow for some time after. It was at this point that I asked him to give me his EVE story thus far, and he obliged:

EVE Mail

What an action-packed couple of days for this EVE newbie! He had lost ships, chatted with players, and in the end had gained a substantial amount of ISK for his efforts. New players take note: this is how you begin your EVE career.

The following day, I received yet another mail from yellow, he had taken up the sport of corpse collecting from the moment he began playing, and it seems he’d had some extra luck with this activity that day:

EVE Mail

Just three days into his EVE career and he’s already popping reds at gates, what a champ. It was shortly after this mail that I decided to help broaden his EVE experience further by inviting him on an MTU hunt. Due to conflicts in schedules, it took a few days until we were both online at the same time, but the hunt did indeed go ahead eventually.

Kill: Sylvous (Mobile Tractor Unit)

The above kill was a first for both of us, for him it was his first MTU kill, and for me it was my first non-solo MTU kill. We racked-up an impressive 8 MTU kills in total that evening, with a further 5 the following evening. By the 3rd day in his MTU Hunting career, yellow had killed his first MTU solo.

This story isn’t over, not by a long shot, but this post is becoming far too long, so stay tuned for the continuation.

MTU Mailbag

Ever since I began my career as an MTU Hunter, I have received quite a lot of mail from capsuleers across New Eden, and now I would like to share some of them with you. Unlike some other hunters out there, I don’t mail the owners of MTUs I have popped, I sit back and let them contact me. I may change this approach in the future.

EVE Mail

Kill: katrin zoloto (Mobile Tractor Unit)

After putting this mail through an online Russian to English translator, we get the following:

container
From: katrin zoloto
To: Pix Severus,
Victory: katrin zoloto (Mobile Tractor Unit *) what’s the point for you?

A good question, the point of hunting MTUs, for me, is to clean highsec of unwanted scan signatures, and have a lot of fun in the meantime. I kept my response brief in the hopes that it wouldn’t come out as incomprehensible garbage after putting it through a translator:

Я очистки пространство всех заброшенных сооружений и трутней
(I clean space of abandoned structures and drones.)

This was the second mail I had ever received about MTU Hunting, the first being from a fellow called Jarrod Jones which can be found towards the bottom of my guide to MTU Hunting here.


EVE Mail

Kill: Ryan del Maina (Mobile Tractor Unit)

This is the most common form of mail I tend to receive from mission runners whose long-abandoned MTUs I have popped. Many don’t remember leaving an MTU out in space, whilst some know that they had left one out there somewhere, but never bothered to scan it down and retrieve it.

This MTU kill was an interesting one, with the MTU containing ship modules typically found on ganking Catalysts. It is possible, of course, that he was simply using a ship with small hybrid guns, lost it in a mission, and had his shipwreck sucked back into his own MTU. However, as the system in question was Osmon, a popular level 4 Sisters of EVE hub, it is more likely that the modules in the container are the remains of a ganking ship.


EVE Mail

Kill: Maks Gotdar (Mobile Tractor Unit)

I received this rather descriptive mail from Maks Gotdar after destroying his MTU in the system of Sheroo, which is next-door to the popular Sisters of EVE hub, Apanake. This mail doesn’t tell us much, apart from perhaps that he was very confused about having his MTU blown up. My response to him clears things up a little, however:

EVE Mail

Going out of my way to complete other people’s missions for them is a nice side-activity I do for the benefit of my fellow capsuleers. I would encourage all MTU Hunters out there to do the same if you are given the chance. Knowledge of missions can be very beneficial in the pursuit of MTU annihilation, and I find that mission runners themselves tend to make very effective hunters for this reason.


EVE Mail

Kill: DerthGerps (Mobile Tractor Unit)

Some pilots tend to be quite happy after I have popped their MTU, showing gratitude for finally removing that niggling-feeling that they’ve left something behind. Although I detect a very slight hint of sarcasm in DerthGerp’s mail to me, I will take it at face value.

Since killing his MTU, DerthGerps has gone forward and racked-up quite a number of MTU kills himself, good for him!


EVE Mail

Kill: NgotoI (Mobile Tractor Unit)

This is one of my favourite mails, and makes a nice change from the rather short mails I tend to receive. I hadn’t heard that song before NgotoI brought it to my attention, you can listen to it here (may not be available in your country). I think this should become the unofficial theme song for MTU Hunting, what do you guys think? If you have a better idea, send me some MTU-related lyrics to your song of choice!


I did not expect the kind of mails I have received since I started hunting MTUs. I was expecting a lot more tears and general bitterness, but perhaps that expectation came from my past experience as a ganker. That isn’t to say I don’t receive any tears at all, mind you, because I do, and if you stick around for future posts, you’ll see them for yourself.